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Growing Trees on the Great Plains by Margaret Brazell (1992-04-16)

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Book Growing Trees on the Great Plains by Margaret Brazell (1992-04-16)

Growing Trees on the Great Plains by Margaret Brazell (1992-04-16)

Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Growing Trees on the Great Plains by Margaret Brazell (1992-04-16).pdf

 

Original name book: Growing Trees on the Great Plains by Margaret Brazell (1992-04-16)

Pages: Unknown

Language: Unknown

Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing (1731)

By:

Book details


Format *An electronic version of a printed book that can be read on a computer or handheld device designed specifically for this purpose. *Report a Broken Link

PDF
Required Software Any PDF Reader, Apple Preview
Supported Devices Windows PC/PocketPC, Mac OS, Linux OS, Apple iPhone/iPod Touch.
# of Devices Unlimited
Flowing Text / Pages Pages
Printable? Yes

Category - Other books

Bestsellers rank - 2 Rating Star

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Customer Reviews
  • By Linda M. Hasselstrom on April 25, 2014

    Margaret Brazell was my neighbor and friend for years on the ranch. We talked every day or two, often while both of us were washing dishes, because we'd made sure our telephone cords were long enough to reach the kitchen sink. We said that our mothers would have deplored our doing something instead of just visiting, but at the same time they wanted us to get our dishes and housework done promptly. They just wouldn't have approved of combining the two.I've written about Margaret in the essay "Beekeeper" in Feels Like Far. She knew she was dying when she signed my copy of the book and wrote, "Plant on! Love, Margaret."The book is flatly the best advice I've ever found for planting trees that will survive on the Great Plains. She wrote it after years of frustration and following the available advice and recommendations of so-called experts as she planted trees on the plains ranch she shared with her husband Bill. She outlines the mistakes they made and tells how they began to have success, so that their place is now an oasis, surrounded by successful shelterbelts. The writing occasionally shows her dry humor, a plains characteristic.Margaret covers everything you need to know to grow trees in a climate similar to this arid grassland beginning with the most important fact: nature doesn't want trees here. Nature wants grass; that's why we have one of the most complex grassland ecosystems in the world. So planting trees means hard work.Early chapters in the book discuss water collection systems, including summerfallow, water catchments, and snow traps. Chapter 3 is "Weed Control," including cultivation, chemicals, and mulch. Chapter 4, "Boosting Tree Survival Rate," discussed watering methods, and commercial products.Chapter 5, "Tough Species," is my favorite, beginning with this way:"Wanted: Industrial strength trees. Must be able to survive inhospitable conditions: temperatures as low as -30 degrees Fahrenheit and as high as 110 degrees Fanrenheit, with breakneck changes between the two extremes; excruciating drought; wretched winds; faint humidity; and skimpy, rock-infested, and often briny soil. No wimps need apply."Then she lists her fifteen favorite trees with their Latin names, including large drawings by Susan Hunt of their shapes, leaves, and fruit. She describes each tree type, including Tall, Medium-Sized and Low-Growing Deciduous as well as Tall and Medium-Sized Evergreens, with ample information about growing conditions, using her own experiences to illuminate the examples. Her instructions about planting are detailed and specific, including sketches to illustrate her points. And finally she provides a Recommended Reading list.

  • By WANDA MANLEY on March 26, 2002

    THIS IS A WONDERFUL BOOK. I CHECKED THIS BOOK OUT AT THE LIBRARY FIRST AND THEN BOUGHT A COPY. IT IS VERY DIFFICULT TO FIND BOOKS DEALING WITH HORTICULTURE IN THIS AREA OF THE UNITED STATES. THE BOOK IS WRITTEN IN A VERY STRAIGHTFORWARD MANNER THAT ANYONE CAN UNDERSTAND, BUT IT'S NOT "DUMBED" DOWN. SHE TOUCHES UPON THE MAIN PRINCIPLES OF TRYING TO GET SOMETHING TO GROW ON THE GREAT PLAINS (WHERE THE WINTERS ARE COLD AND WINDY, AND THE SUMMERS ARE HOT AND DRY): SOILS, WATER, MULCHING, AND CHOOSING THE CORRECT TREES AND SHRUBS. SHE LISTS HER FAVORITES WITH A SHORT JUSTIFICATION FOR EACH SPECIES AND OFFERS TIPS ON KEEPING THE COST DOWN ON DRIPLINE IRRIGATION. YOU CAN'T MISS WITH THIS BOOK!!

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